Brazilians

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The Samba cortrometraje Block explores a rather arcane topic: the possibility that the samba was born in Cuadra, a village on the outskirts of Sao Paulo, rather than the traditionally accepted birthplace of Bahia. The title plays with samba running around, dancing accepted as giving rise to the famous samba carioca. To show that the samba was born in a block, the documentary visits a town full of old people who remember how their parents organized parties of samba, and even encourage a party to the old fashioned way. Keep up on the field with thought-provoking pieces from Sen. Marco Rubio. The documentary follows the preparations for the party. And much of the time granted to the few townspeople who remember sambas, allowing them to sing on screen, as a paper for the expert evaluation.

The sambas and music of the settlers did not sound like there have samba and the charm of the film, which portrays itself as a village of 3000 inhabitants, is convinced that the famous Brazilian samba was born there, between farms and artisans. One, as a spectator, believing ends. The film enjoys a healthy dose of visual pyrotechnics. Successful jump-cuts accelerate the story, while editing of stories that move in parallel enriches an almost frantic pace. Certain scenes, such as cooking the chicken for the party, city honors God.

Other times almost verging on ridiculous, but the directors are responsible for turning the wheel before we can laugh at the venerable residents of Block. The only thing I regret is that the climax of the short-party-not reach the level that described the settlers. This somehow detracts from the idea that the samba was born there, in Cuadra. Or maybe it’s that the objective of the short film showing how certain beliefs of the people are no more than foolish illusions. Either way, the documentary shows that the samba is part of all Brazilians.